In 1991, Christophe Lemaire founded his namesake fashion label in Paris, France, which was soon lauded for its timeless everyday wear and ardent fanbase. Thinking of all skin tones, Lemaire developed a signature dialed-down color palette and understated aesthetic for his practical garments made of innovative materials. These silhouettes are manifested in the brand’s staples—namely, the dry silk shirts and the asymmetrical Twisted Dress with button detailing. When Sarah-Linh Tran joined at the helm in 2010 as co-creative director, Lemaire entered a renaissance. Today, the Lemaire brand has a wider reach than ever, transcending genre, gender, and age with a leather goods line, jewelry offerings, and collaboration with Japanese lifewear brand Uniqlo.

Welcome to the 90th issue of B.

I like to peruse clothes in intimate boutiques, where I can focus and feel calm without excessive hospitality or wary looks. Like leisurely browsing books at a neighborhood bookstore. While it is true that the e-commerce market is ever expanding—and online stores keep improving delivery systems and customer service to the point where it cannot get any more convenient—I still think that you have to see and touch each article of clothing to know if it is good. Here, you might ask what defines “good.” Standards for good clothes are determined by time and circumstances. That said, I think good clothes should reveal the creator’s sincerity toward the basic principles of clothing and their level of care to incorporate subtle details. I’m more drawn to creators who approach clothing carefully and thoughtfully, thus defying the recent trend of overshadowing the actual clothing with entertainment marketing or allowing brand names to be the singular defining standard of quality. I liken it to enjoying dishes that spotlight the unique flavors of ingredients rather than the reputations of chefs.

I distinctly remember feeling quite impressed when I first encountered French fashion label Lemaire. The clothes clearly revealed the brand’s ethos behind its choice of colors, materials, silhouettes, and other details. What’s more, the pieces prove their
real worth when they are worn, and people get to keep filling their wardrobes with Lemaire once they become familiar with the brand. This characteristic is often described as “minimalism” and “normcore,” but I think “everyday wear” best describes what Lemaire is after. But this brand’s everyday wear is not particularly affordable, its collections are not released super frequently, and its designs are far from bland ones that do not quite communicate any particular identity. Even though everyday wear has long been considered low on the fashion totem pole, Lemaire deftly expresses the full potential of clothing through this style.

The brand’s founder and co-creative director Christophe Lemaire says that he designs clothes based on people’s ordinary movements in everyday life and that what people feel through the clothes they wear is important. This explains why some describe Lemaire’s clothing as being something out of a movie rather than something out of a fantasy. To put it another way, Lemaire is an urban-like brand. City dwellers want to blend in naturally with their environment, which is exactly what Lemaire pieces do. Whether it is morning in Paris, nighttime in Seoul, a lush outdoor park, or a restaurant with modern décor, Lemaire fits into the scene seamlessly.

Come to think of it, we pay more attention to clothes that suit the wearer and the space rather than loud garments that stand out like museum pieces. And that’s because clothing only comes to life when it is connected to the wearer’s language, movements, and attitude. In other words, curiosity about and observation of an individual’s clothing can provide important clues about who they are. A person’s so-called private clothes say so much and is more nuanced than you might believe, and good clothes enrich those fine details. This was the most interesting thing that I discovered while working on this issue. I hope that our readers, too, enjoy the many stories woven into clothing and take time to think about the variegated nuances of each piece.

Eunsung Park
Content & Editorial Director

INTRO
EDITOR’S LETTER
PERSONAL ARCHIVES

Hints of Christophe Lemaire and Sarah- Linh Tran’s creativity found in their work spaces

IN MARAIS

The Lemaire headquarters blends into the Marais, a historic district in Paris

SMALL TALK

People at Lemaire affirm their personal beliefs about clothing and the brand’s unwavering trajectory

INTERVIEW: CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE & SARAH-LINH TRAN

Co-creative directors of Lemaire

ON-SITE WORKSHOP

Lemaire’s in-house atelier materializes the brand’s design universe

LEMAIRE WARDROBE

Lemaire’s iconic style imbues the brand’s shirts, jackets, overcoats, and other essential items

UNDERSTATEMENT

Delicate design language expressed through colors, materials, silhouettes, and other details

OPINION: ANJA ARONOWSKY CRONBERG

Fashion journalist Anja Aronowsky Cronberg attests that Lemaire provides physical and mental comfort through its clothes

DEFINITE

The unique perspectives of Lemaire brand fans who refuse to compare themselves with others

AT THE BOUTIQUE

Lemaire boutiques reflect the brand’s comfortable and calm mood

CRAFT PARTNERS

The brand expands its aesthetic domain through ingenious partnerships with artisans and artists

OPINION: SONYA DYAKOVA

Graphic designer Sonya Dyakova says that the allure of Lemaire is that it has created its own narrative by incorporating cultural elements in fashion

IN THE COLLECTIONS

Impressive Lemaire collections created in collaboration with outside creators

INDIVIDUALS

Strong personalities who have appeared on Lemaire runways

ESSAYS

Thoughts on the charms of Lemaire as everyday wear that is anything but mundane

AN OPTICAL POEM

Lemaire’s color palette reflects light, shadow, and nature’

BRAND STORY

How Lemaire grew while concentrating on creating styles rather than fashion

INSPIRATIONS

Music, films, books, and architecture that inspire the Lemaire designer duo

Outro

PUBLICATION RIGHT

Publisher
Suyong Joh

Executive Director
Myungsoo Kim

Content & Editorial Director
Eunsung Park

Senior Editor
Narae Kim, Jaewoo Seo

Editors
Hyekang Park, Sunwoo Choi, Jaeyoung Kim

Art Direction & Design
Yuwon Choi


Photographer
Miyeon Yoon

Marketing
Hyunjoo Kim, Yeubin Kim

Sales & Distribution
Suyeon Kim, Kiran Kim, Soojin Song

Finance
Hyosun Hong

Managing & Editing (English Edition)
Rayna Kim

Translation (English Edition)
Rancy Kim, Bongah Shin, Hyejoo Lee, Seongae Yang, Soonok Hwang

Copy Editing (English Edition)
Sarah Kessler-Jang

Correspondents
Mihye Nam (Tokyo), Lena Shin (LA), Alex Seo (London), Sanghyeok Lee (Berlin), Hyeseon Jeong (Paris), Mark Carter (Bangkok)

Publishing
JOH